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The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Podcast/Garden talk radio show (heard across the country)
Garden talk radio, to help your garden grow
Category: Home & Garden
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Joey & Holly host of The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Podcast. Sharing organic gardening and canning information for the healt...


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October 19, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment 1 Joey and Holly talk Winter composting

Keep adding carbon
First to remember is that the compost has to be fed the right balance of green (nitrogen) and brown (carbon) ingredients. Green scraps will be produced in your kitchen over the winter, but most of the brown matter such as dried leaves, straw and plant debris, will have been produced in the fall. Gather the fall leaves and bag them, or put them in a dry place near the compost, to balance the green scraps that are added through the winter. Bear in mind that slightly more brown matter is needed to balance the green added to the compost.
While leaves can be a great carbon source for the compost, and more are needed for winter composting, there can be too much of a good thing. That is why a separate leaf compost can be set up.
Collect leaves in the fall and store under cover for composting use throughout winter.
To start a leaf compost pile, gather together the leaves and layer with dirt: use one layer of dirt for each foot of leaves. The pile should be about 4ft in diameter and 3ft deep. Make sure it is damp enough that a drop or two can be squeezed out of a handful from the center of the pile. Cover with plastic, weighing down the edges with rocks. Try not to compress the leaves. The compost will be ready when it is dark and crumbly, in about five to six months. This compost is not for fertilizer, as it really does not have many nutrients in it; but it is an excellent organic addition to soil.
Insulate the active compost
Even in the coldest weather, the microbes in the compost must be kept active. This means making sure they stay warm. In preparation for this, harvest the finished compost in fall to make room for new additions to the mix over the winter. Use it in houseplants; spread it over the lawn, over the gardens and around shrubs. When overhauling the compost system, move the bin into the sun for the winter or into a warmer part of the yard. Be realistic when choosing its location, considering what it will be like to add kitchen waste in heavy rains, wind or just plain cold temperatures. Start rebuilding with a layer of leaves, or with straw, cardboard or sawdust. Put the active part in the middle, and then cover it with more brown matter. This insulates the active compost.
Monitor the moisture
In milder climates, insulation is not so important in keeping compost bacteria active, but there may be other challenges. In cold, rainy locations such as California’s Bay Area, coastal Oregon and Washington State, it is moisture control that’s most important in maintaining active compost through winter. This can be difficult with a pile system, as the rain soaks into the ground and is taken up by the compost. Keep compost piles well covered to prevent the rain from directly falling on the pile.
Compost tumblers are sealed units so rain is not a problem. However, even a sealed composter can be too wet inside during the winter months. This is usually due to a shortage of carbon materials to absorb the moisture from nitrogen materials such as kitchen scraps. High humidity also contributes to excess moisture since most composters are aerated. Add carbon materials such as peat or dry leaves which absorb moisture, and open any drain holes in the composter. To learn more about restoring a wet, inactive compost, read our article How to Fix a Soggy Compost Pile.
The American South varies as to the composting needs in places. In Florida’s semi-tropical climate, residents will find that winter composting is much the same as summer composting. Texas, on the other hand, can provide challenges depending on where in the state the compost pile is located. With its near-desert conditions, West Texas can present a challenge in the summer; but on the Panhandle, which is the Great Plains, the incessant winter wind and blowing snow make moisture control imperative. Check the compost when adding scraps, making sure that the wind has not dried the compost out. This also applies in Washington State, east of the Cascades, and through Montana and the Dakotas.
Composting in the desert can present its own problems. In winter it is a good idea to mound the compost, then make a crater in the top, to catch what rain there is. To make the most of catching the water, a 1-2inch pipe with holes drilled at regular intervals can distribute moisture more deeply into the compost.
The different composting methods have different procedures for overwintering the compost. In essence, they are all about controlling temperature and moisture.
Here’s a look at the basic composting methods and how they can be used to provide compost through the winter months.
Compost tumblers
Compost tumblers are the most efficient closed-bin systems and make year-round composting relatively easy. A composting tumbler is a bin on a support, so it can be spun to mix the compost. The tumbler has some form of aeration, such as vents, spikes or a perforated tube running up the center for airflow. Its self-containment makes it easy to move, and the dark color helps keep the tumbler warm. Continued feeding with both green and brown matter can keep the bacteria alive and working.
The good part, besides the above, is that wildlife cannot access the scraps put in these containers. Tumblers keep the compost contained, all in one place, and odor-free for city dwellers. Composting tumblers are also called batch composters, as they break down one batch at a time. Some models have dual compartments so one batch can be added to while the other matures. Because they are contained and elevated from the ground, compost tumblers are the easiest way of keeping compost active through winter.
A dual-chamber composter has one chamber for active use while the other matures.
Compost bins
Another closed-bin system that is inexpensive is the ‘compost digester’, or standing compost bin. These are usually open-bottom bins which sit directly on the ground. Materials are added from the top and finished composted is removed from the bottom, commonly through a sliding port. Turning the compost is not really feasible since there’s little room to work a pitchfork, so this means it can take months to produce finished compost.
To overwinter a digester bin, add plenty of dry materials such as leaves, thatch, or straw in layers whenever you add food waste or moist materials. The core of the composting mass should remain active through the cold months. If you empty the bin in the fall, move it to a sunny spot for winter, and insulate it during cold snaps.
Compost bins are available in small sizes, and are good for a city dweller with just one or two people providing the scraps to compost. Digester bins are good for continuous composting, and they’re able to handle a wide range of scraps. They are ideal for the homeowner who just wants to toss in their scraps and harvest compost when it is needed. They’re also convenient for the gardener for tossing in shrub prunings and plant skeletons from the harvested vegetable garden.
Compost piles
Compost piles are the simplest composting system, since most organic material left on the ground will eventually compost. To begin a compost pile, start the pile on the ground with a bottom layer of sticks, twigs or straw in order to aerate and to allow earthworms and bugs to climb up. Add compost in layers, starting with green from kitchen scraps, grass clippings and so on, and then brown from dried leaves, sawdust, straw and wood ash. To really jumpstart a pile, find horse or steer manure to get it going. As with the other composting systems, keep it moist, and turn using a pitchfork to aerate. Cover the pile with a tarp to keep the rain out.
Overwintering with a compost pile can have its drawbacks. Even if the pile is kept covered with a tarp, ground moisture can wick up into the pile and slow the composting process. The tarp or cover must be removed each time new materials are added, which can become tedious during periods of snow and freeze-ups. And raccoons, rodents and domestic pets can and will burrow into the pile in search of anything edible among your latest contributions.
Even though it’s usually a messy affair, a compost pile can be maintained through winter. With a dark tarp and generous insulation using straw, newspapers or leaves, the bacteria may remain active except during the coldest times of year. In spring you can shovel through the pile and find plenty of ready-to-use compost at the bottom.
Insulation
In all but the most active composters, insulation will be needed to ensure the compost remains active through winter.
Insulation can be as simple as cardboard, straw or brown leaves covering a compost pile, or as complex as a shelter built and insulated around a bin. A tumbler system can be moved into a garage, greenhouse or shed for added warmth and protection from the wind. A digester system can have straw bales stacked around it, or a small structure can be built and stuffed with insulation between the box and the bin.
In maintaining the active compost, snow may not be the problem it seems. Snow is a very effective insulator. Look for ways to reduce the wind chill factor, such as locating the composter on the lee side of a building, fence or natural feature.
Indoor methods of composting
Why would anyone want to brave cold and snow just to take scraps out to the compost? Fortunately, there are ways to deal with waste materials over the winter without having to face the winter head-on. One solution is an insulated sealed composter that sits in a corner of the garage. A sealed composter with proper balance of carbon and nitrogen components will not emit any composting odors.
Another method is worm composting, or vermiculture. A Worm Composter is efficient, odorless and can be kept indoors. There are those who may not want to have a worm compost system in their home, for various reasons; however, worm composters can also be kept in the garage or outside.
A third way of composting indoors is to use a food waste digester like the Food Cycler. These countertop models chop and dehydrate food scraps, reducing them to nutrient-rich fertilizer. Store over the winter in a bag or bucket and apply to your garden come springtime.
Probably the best reason to maintain an active compost over winter is the head start it gives your early spring garden. During winter, your compost will also provide a welcome boost for your houseplants throughout the dreary winter months.
In gardening, so much is preparation. Summer is preparation for winter, to grow food that will see families through the cold months; but rarely is winter seen as preparation for summer. Composting is one of the many ways in which a homeowner can prepare for spring and the growing season. In keeping compost active and producing that black gold the plants love so much, we connect winter to summer, making each complement the other with what nature has to offer; taking the remains of last summer to make new plants this summer. Keeping the compost going over winter is satisfying to the gardener while providing a wonderful bounty for spring.

In segment two Joey and Holly go over 5 tips now to help you in the spring
Go through your seeds now
Go through tools - make list
Think about what did well - note - take pictures
Gather leaves for spring
Drain irrigation
Toss any disease plants - blight - rust
Construct low tunnels
Buy potting soil
Clean out seed starting trays

In segment three Joey and Holly welcome Pamela Crawford is an award-winning, nationally known landscape designer and author of ten best-selling gardening books. She has successfully designed over 1500 landscapes in the last 25 years. Her beautiful designs are routinely covered by newspapers, national magazines and television. https://pamela-crawford.com/about/background/

1.You’re very passionate about container gardening, why is that?
2. Why are container gardens important to you?
3.Sometimes people want to use larger containers but aren’t sure how or feel intimidated by them, what are some tips for incorporating larger containers into a landscape or even as an accent?
4. What are some soil tips for container gardening? Should one dump all the soil out and start fresh every season, or fertilize what they have?
5.What is a living wall and how can people plan for that now to grow next spring or in their ideal growing season?
6.You have a book coming out in January called Easy Patio Veggies and Herbs – what is a something specific in that book our listeners would enjoy and what does it all entail?
7.How can people find out more about you and your books

In segment four Joey and Holly answer gardener's questions

1.its October now. I just cleared a bunch of weedy shrubs and trees. Can I plant turnips as a cover crop now or is it too late? Zone 5b
A: Thank you for the question, it is not too late you can plant them as late as Nov as long as the ground is not frozen.
2. If I may ask a question about a previous video. I think it was you who suggested not throwing away seeds I will not be using but to put them out for birds. Are there any seeds that birds, chipmunks or squirrels should not have?
A as long as they seeds are not treated you are good to put all the seeds out from them.

3. Is it good to take the old not diseased plant stalks and leaves and compost this in the soil?? I have clay soil and this helped to break it up and in the spring the good worms have digested all greens and soil is good for planting. Is this good? I do not use the roots of plants.
Love your show. Linda
A:we are happy to hear you love the show. To answer your question, Yes this is a very good way to help build the soil up and break the clay soil apart for better root growth.

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 13, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment 1 Joey and Holly talk about growing and caring for Mums
Garden mums are cold-hardy and can survive winter and thrive as perennials.

- If you want to add garden mums to your landscape, the best time to plant them is when the temperature starts to cool off in the evening.
-Mums have the best chance of surviving winter when planted in September.
-Just like any other perennial planted in the fall, timing is essential in establishing a strong root system before the first frost.
-Think about how you want to use color in your landscape. If you are planting mums amongst shrubs or greenery, white, pink, yellow or lavender will really pop. If your autumn decorating includes pumpkins, gourds, cornstalks or hay bales, consider shades of orange, copper, purple and wine.
-Another tip–darker mums tend to hold their color longer, and as the flowers fade, it won’t be as noticeable as on lighter-colored plants.
- Can plant in containers to replace other annuals
- Their bold blooms bring the autumn color like nothing else and are guaranteed to perk up even the drabbest of landscapes.
- Bloom for about 7 weeks
- Plant in an area that gets 6 or more hours of sunlight
- zones 3 – 6 – look for early blooming varieties – cover with evergreen or burlap to help them come back
- plant in well draining soil
- be sure to “dead head”
- water consistently for best continuous growth

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 16, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment four Joey and Holly answer gardener's questions.

Q: I have a large asparagus bed at our new property. The weeds are getting a little out of control. I’d like to mulch areas in the garden to help reduce weeds.
What type of mulch is best? I would like to mulch a walking path, spread in the rhubarb bed, and in asparagus patch.
should I use a natural mulch or shredded bark mulch? What would be a best practice?
A: we would suggest a shredded bark or woodchip mulch. This will give a good foundation for walking and really help reduce the weeds.

2. When is the right time to harvest Jersulsem artichokes

3. Can I plant store bought garlic?

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 15, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment three Joey and Holly welcome their guest Wendy Williams is an author, but also has a lifetime career in journalism, working first as a reporter for a daily newspaper, and then as an independent. Her work has been published in a myriad of places ranging from the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times to Ladies Home Journal and Audubon. As a daily journalist, she has won many awards. https://wendywilliamsauthor.com/

1.As a journalist, what inspired you to write books about science and nature?
2.You have a recent book – The Language of Butterflies – what is this book about?
3.What can our listeners expect when they read it?
4.Something highly notable in your most recent book?
5.Out of all the insects – why butterflies to write a book on?
6.How can we find out more about you?

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 14, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment two Joey and Holly talk about evergreen tree care and problems
Bagworms

Bagworms are common on junipers and arborvitae. Caterpillars hatch in spring and form a protective bag as they feed on foliage. Handpick the bags whenever present. A good time is in winter or early spring before the young hatch from eggs inside the bag. Insecticidal sprays used early when young hatch are an effective control.

Normal needle drop

Homeowners are often alarmed when needles on their needled evergreen, such as pines, arborvitae, spruce, and junipers, turn yellow or brown in fall. If yellowing needles are confined to inner older needles, the most likely cause is normal shedding of needles. Dying tips or whole branches, however, are not normal and may be a disease problem.

Diplodia tip blight

This tip blight is very common on Austrian pines in our area. You can recognize it by the tips of branches turning brown and dying. The disease usually starts on the lower branches and moves up the tree. Progression is slow, but the disease will deform and eventually kill the tree. Sanitation, such as pruning out infected tips, can slow the progress of the disease.

Cytospora canker

Dying lower branches on spruce are often caused by this canker disease, which kills the branch close to the trunk of the tree. We often receive pieces of dying tips of spruce branches but few patrons bring in a whole branch or examine the branch further back to see if something there may be causing the problem. A close examination should be your first inclination when you see dying branches on spruce.

White pine decline

White pines are not well adapted to our heavy clay soils and hot humid summers. Consequently, they may struggle to establish a robust root system. They can decline over time and/or develop other disease problems. Provide white pines with a good well-drained soil and ample moisture during dry periods to give them a fighting chance.

Snow and ice

Winter weather, including fluctuating temperatures, snow build-up, and ice, can damage trees. There may be little a gardener can do to prevent these damages, but removing damaged limbs by proper pruning and limiting other stresses such as lack of water can help plants to recover.

Pine wilt

This disease is caused by the proliferation of a small microscopic nematode. They grow in and clog the water-conducting tissue of some pines. Scotch, Austrian, and Japanese black pine are most affected in our area. Needles lose their bright green color and quickly become dry and brittle due to the lack of water. There is no cure.

Cedar-apple rust

Those golf ball-size brown growths (galls) on junipers that develop bright orange “horns” are the fruiting bodies of a very common rust disease that moves back and forth between juniper and apple. On apples the disease results in a leafspot. Pruning out the galls on junipers in winter is an effective control.

Pine needle scale

This scale may go unnoticed unless you examine your pines closely. On close inspection the ¼” white scales are very evident. Control should be initiated when the young hatch from eggs protected under the scale. They crawl around the plant to infest new needles. During this crawler stage the insect is most susceptible to insecticides. Mugo pines are very susceptible.

Pine sawflies

These caterpillar-like insects, which are actually the larvae of a sawfly can result in rapid defoliation of last year’s needles. Their feeding time is short and new needles will grow from buds at the tips of the branches. Quick action is required if defoliation of needles is to be stopped. Note that many controls for caterpillars are not effective against sawfly larvae.

Right Plant, Right Place

Properly siting an evergreen tree or shrub is the first step in preventing disease or damage. Because most can suffer from wind damage or sun scald, especially in climates with long and snowy winters, it’s important to avoid placing your evergreens where they are fully exposed to sun and drying winds. Ask your local garden center about varieties that are more wind resistant, or consider protecting them with a wind-breaking fence. Since improperly wrapping trees and shrubs can actually damage your plants, you should consult with a licensed Arborist or horticulturist before you go about buying tree wrap or burlap.

Overly wet or clay soils can be challenging for many plants, including evergreen trees and shrubs. There are some varieties, like Atlantic White Cedar, that do well in wet soils, but as a general rule if your soil stays wet or mushy for more than a day, you may need to build a berm or stick with containerized evergreens.

Water, Water, Water

While most evergreens require very little pruning if left to grow in their natural form, they do need frequent watering, especially in the first year they are planted. If not properly watered, evergreens will be more likely to suffer from winter burn or sun scald. Be sure your evergreens are getting at least an inch of water per week! Avoid giving them frequent, but short waterings, and instead water them deeply with a soaker hose or buy a Tree Gator for hot summers or dry fall weather.

It is really important that evergreens have plenty of water leading into winter in regions where the ground freezes. Many home owners are vigilant about watering in the summer, but forget to water when the weather cools into the fall. This is the time it is most important for these trees to be well hydrated, so be sure you keep those hoses and sprinklers going until the first freeze.

Fertilize Lightly

Evergreens are very slow growers and can generally absorb most of the nutrients they need from the soil. In very sandy areas or areas where the soil pH is more basic, your evergreens may have difficulty absorbing the nutrients they need. If your trees seem to be unnaturally pale green, they may need a little nitrogen. Never add fertilizer to the planting hole of your evergreens! If you fertilize at all, use a balanced, slow-release fertilizer or one designed specifically for evergreens,

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 12, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment 1 Joey and Holly talk about growing and caring for Mums
Garden mums are cold-hardy and can survive winter and thrive as perennials.

- If you want to add garden mums to your landscape, the best time to plant them is when the temperature starts to cool off in the evening.
-Mums have the best chance of surviving winter when planted in September.
-Just like any other perennial planted in the fall, timing is essential in establishing a strong root system before the first frost.
-Think about how you want to use color in your landscape. If you are planting mums amongst shrubs or greenery, white, pink, yellow or lavender will really pop. If your autumn decorating includes pumpkins, gourds, cornstalks or hay bales, consider shades of orange, copper, purple and wine.
-Another tip–darker mums tend to hold their color longer, and as the flowers fade, it won’t be as noticeable as on lighter-colored plants.
- Can plant in containers to replace other annuals
- Their bold blooms bring the autumn color like nothing else and are guaranteed to perk up even the drabbest of landscapes.
- Bloom for about 7 weeks
- Plant in an area that gets 6 or more hours of sunlight
- zones 3 – 6 – look for early blooming varieties – cover with evergreen or burlap to help them come back
- plant in well draining soil
- be sure to “dead head”
- water consistently for best continuous growth

In segment two Joey and Holly talk about evergreen tree care and problems
Bagworms

Bagworms are common on junipers and arborvitae. Caterpillars hatch in spring and form a protective bag as they feed on foliage. Handpick the bags whenever present. A good time is in winter or early spring before the young hatch from eggs inside the bag. Insecticidal sprays used early when young hatch are an effective control.

Normal needle drop

Homeowners are often alarmed when needles on their needled evergreen, such as pines, arborvitae, spruce, and junipers, turn yellow or brown in fall. If yellowing needles are confined to inner older needles, the most likely cause is normal shedding of needles. Dying tips or whole branches, however, are not normal and may be a disease problem.

Diplodia tip blight

This tip blight is very common on Austrian pines in our area. You can recognize it by the tips of branches turning brown and dying. The disease usually starts on the lower branches and moves up the tree. Progression is slow, but the disease will deform and eventually kill the tree. Sanitation, such as pruning out infected tips, can slow the progress of the disease.

Cytospora canker

Dying lower branches on spruce are often caused by this canker disease, which kills the branch close to the trunk of the tree. We often receive pieces of dying tips of spruce branches but few patrons bring in a whole branch or examine the branch further back to see if something there may be causing the problem. A close examination should be your first inclination when you see dying branches on spruce.

White pine decline

White pines are not well adapted to our heavy clay soils and hot humid summers. Consequently, they may struggle to establish a robust root system. They can decline over time and/or develop other disease problems. Provide white pines with a good well-drained soil and ample moisture during dry periods to give them a fighting chance.

Snow and ice

Winter weather, including fluctuating temperatures, snow build-up, and ice, can damage trees. There may be little a gardener can do to prevent these damages, but removing damaged limbs by proper pruning and limiting other stresses such as lack of water can help plants to recover.

Pine wilt

This disease is caused by the proliferation of a small microscopic nematode. They grow in and clog the water-conducting tissue of some pines. Scotch, Austrian, and Japanese black pine are most affected in our area. Needles lose their bright green color and quickly become dry and brittle due to the lack of water. There is no cure.

Cedar-apple rust

Those golf ball-size brown growths (galls) on junipers that develop bright orange “horns” are the fruiting bodies of a very common rust disease that moves back and forth between juniper and apple. On apples the disease results in a leafspot. Pruning out the galls on junipers in winter is an effective control.

Pine needle scale

This scale may go unnoticed unless you examine your pines closely. On close inspection the ¼” white scales are very evident. Control should be initiated when the young hatch from eggs protected under the scale. They crawl around the plant to infest new needles. During this crawler stage the insect is most susceptible to insecticides. Mugo pines are very susceptible.

Pine sawflies

These caterpillar-like insects, which are actually the larvae of a sawfly can result in rapid defoliation of last year’s needles. Their feeding time is short and new needles will grow from buds at the tips of the branches. Quick action is required if defoliation of needles is to be stopped. Note that many controls for caterpillars are not effective against sawfly larvae.

Right Plant, Right Place

Properly siting an evergreen tree or shrub is the first step in preventing disease or damage. Because most can suffer from wind damage or sun scald, especially in climates with long and snowy winters, it’s important to avoid placing your evergreens where they are fully exposed to sun and drying winds. Ask your local garden center about varieties that are more wind resistant, or consider protecting them with a wind-breaking fence. Since improperly wrapping trees and shrubs can actually damage your plants, you should consult with a licensed Arborist or horticulturist before you go about buying tree wrap or burlap.

Overly wet or clay soils can be challenging for many plants, including evergreen trees and shrubs. There are some varieties, like Atlantic White Cedar, that do well in wet soils, but as a general rule if your soil stays wet or mushy for more than a day, you may need to build a berm or stick with containerized evergreens.

Water, Water, Water

While most evergreens require very little pruning if left to grow in their natural form, they do need frequent watering, especially in the first year they are planted. If not properly watered, evergreens will be more likely to suffer from winter burn or sun scald. Be sure your evergreens are getting at least an inch of water per week! Avoid giving them frequent, but short waterings, and instead water them deeply with a soaker hose or buy a Tree Gator for hot summers or dry fall weather.

It is really important that evergreens have plenty of water leading into winter in regions where the ground freezes. Many home owners are vigilant about watering in the summer, but forget to water when the weather cools into the fall. This is the time it is most important for these trees to be well hydrated, so be sure you keep those hoses and sprinklers going until the first freeze.

Fertilize Lightly

Evergreens are very slow growers and can generally absorb most of the nutrients they need from the soil. In very sandy areas or areas where the soil pH is more basic, your evergreens may have difficulty absorbing the nutrients they need. If your trees seem to be unnaturally pale green, they may need a little nitrogen. Never add fertilizer to the planting hole of your evergreens! If you fertilize at all, use a balanced, slow-release fertilizer or one designed specifically for evergreens,

In segment three Joey and Holly welcome their guest Wendy Williams is an author, but also has a lifetime career in journalism, working first as a reporter for a daily newspaper, and then as an independent. Her work has been published in a myriad of places ranging from the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times to Ladies Home Journal and Audubon. As a daily journalist, she has won many awards. https://wendywilliamsauthor.com/

1.As a journalist, what inspired you to write books about science and nature?
2.You have a recent book – The Language of Butterflies – what is this book about?
3.What can our listeners expect when they read it?
4.Something highly notable in your most recent book?
5.Out of all the insects – why butterflies to write a book on?
6.How can we find out more about you?

In segment four Joey and Holly answer gardener's questions.

Q: I have a large asparagus bed at our new property. The weeds are getting a little out of control. I’d like to mulch areas in the garden to help reduce weeds.
What type of mulch is best? I would like to mulch a walking path, spread in the rhubarb bed, and in asparagus patch.
should I use a natural mulch or shredded bark mulch? What would be a best practice?
A: we would suggest a shredded bark or woodchip mulch. This will give a good foundation for walking and really help reduce the weeds.

2. When is the right time to harvest Jersulsem artichokes

3. Can I plant store bought garlic?

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 09, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment four Joey and Holly answer gardener's questions
I think I am pushing the limits on these plants for my zone but wanted to test the water. I am located in West Boylston MA
1- I just planted a crepe myrtle outside in somewhat of a protected area and it is flowering and doing well. I know it's not really for my zone but decided I would give it a try. I understand if I take care of it with mulch and TLC it could possibly survive. Your thoughts/suggestions?

2- I also have a lily of the Nile (agapanthus) in a pot and it is doing GREAT, it has the most beautiful flower(only one). I know it's a tender perennial and will need to be taken in for the winter. Should I take it out of pot and put in paper bag with peat moss in the cellar near the bulk head or should I leave it in the pot? I know I will need to water monthly.
I also have one in the garden and what is best to bring that in for the winter. This one did not flower but the leaves are really green and look healthy. What can I use on both plants to ensure that I do not bring in any bugs? I DO NOT want any of my house plants infected since I have MANY!
Thanks in advance
Gail
A: Here is some really informative info on crepe myrtle.

https://www.pennlive.com/gardening/2013/11/protecting_a_crape_myrtle_in_w.html

As far as the lily of the nile, here is a great resource on over wintering them. You will see when you scroll down a bit and look at the part about agapanthus.

You can spray the plant with a hose and inspect it for bugs. You will likely have soil gnats no matter what you do. You could keep the over winter plant far away from your house plants, and that should prevent issue. There's not really a fool-proof way to prevent any possible bug from entering your home.

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 08, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment three Joey and Holly Welcome their guest
Emma Toth who is a gardener and founder of Food is Free Milwaukee. Their mission is to assist Milwaukee residents in creating charitable food gardens that provide free, hyper locally grown produce to the community while increasing positive neighborhood engagement through food cultivation and harvest sharing. to find more out search food is free MKE on FB
https://www.facebook.com/foodisfreemke

1. Why did you decide to create the food is free project, what was your inspiration?
2. Is this something in Milwaukee only, or is there something similar in other cities across the country?
3. What exactly is the food is free project and what are some great successes?
4.You grow this food to share, what are some challenges you face in doing so? What inspired you to grow food?

5. How can we find out more about you?

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 07, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment two Joey and Holly talk about Pumpkins more then just carving them
All about pumpkins!

The top pumpkin-producing states include Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and California. According to the Illinois Department of Agriculture, 95% of the U.S. crop intended for processing is grown in Illinois.
45 different varieties
Whip up some pumpkin purée.
Make a pumpkin planter.
Pumpkin facial mask
Pumpkin seeds
Feed the wildlife.
Feed your own animals
Make something sweet
Mix up a pumpkin cocktail.
Pumpkin hummus
Use the guts to make pumpkin/veggie stock
Pumpkin soup
Canned pumpkin

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

October 06, 2020 04:00 AM PDT

The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from
March – Oct weekly
Heard on Joy 1340 AM & 98.7 FM Milwaukee, WI Saturday mornings 7-8 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Joy-1340-s30042/
Heard on WCRN 830 AM Westborough/Boston, MA Saturdays 8-9 AM EST https://tunein.com/radio/WCRN-AM-830-Full-Service-Radio-s1112/
Heard on KYAH 540 AM Delta/Salt Lake City, UT Saturdays 1-2 PM MST Reply Sundays 9-10 PM MST https://www.yahradio540.com/listen-live/
Heard on KDIZ 1570 AM Minneapolis, MN Saturdays 4-5 PM and replay Sundays 2-3 PM CST http://player.listenlive.co/57071
Heard on WAAM 1600 AM & 92.7 FM Ann Arbor, MI Sundays 7-8 AM EST https://tinyurl.com/p68cvft
Heard on WOGO 680 AM & 103.1 FM Chippewa Falls, WI Sundays 9-10 AM CST https://www.christiannetcast.com/listen/player.asp?station=wogo-am
Heard on KFEQ 680 AM & 107.9 FM St. Joseph/Kansas City, MO Sundays 10-11 AM CST http://www.680kfeq.com/live-stream/
Heard on WNAX 570 AM Yankton SD Sundays 10-11 AM CST https://tunein.com/radio/Radio-570-s36447/
Heard on WRMN 1410 AM & 96.7 FM Elgin/Chicago, IL Sundays Noon-1 PM CST https://www.wrmn1410.com/
Heard on KMET 1490 AM & 98.1 FM Banning, CA Tuesdays 9 - 10 AM PST https://www.kmet1490am.com/
Check out https://thewisconsinvegetablegardener.com/
Email your questions to Gardentalkradio@gmail.com
Or call 24/7 leave your question at 1-800 927-SHOW

In segment 1 Joey and Holly talk about Growing food indoors overwinter
sponsored by Happy leaf led grow lights Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com

What can you grow
Grow in what medium
Think about nutrients
Pollinate your plants

Check out the companies that make the show possible
Power Planter of www.powerplanter.com
Proplugger of www.proplugger.com
World's coolest rain gauge www.worldscoolestraingauge.com
Rootmaker of www.rootmaker.com Us coupon code TWVG at checkout and save 10% of your order
Tomato snaps of www.tomatosnaps.com
Chapin Manufacturing Inc. of www.chapinmfg.com
Pomona pectin of www.pomonapectin.com
Iv organics of www.ivorganics.com
Dr. JimZ of www.drjimz.com
Seed Savers Exchange of www.seedsavers.org
Waterhoop of www.waterhoop.com
Green Gobbler of www.greengobbler.com
Nessalla koombucha of www.nessalla.com
MI Green House LLC of www.migreenhouse.com
Phyllom BioProducts of www.phyllombioproducts.com
Happy leaf led of www.happyleafled.com
Neptunes harvest of www.neptunesharvest.com
Dripworks of www.dripworks.com
We Grow Indoors of www.wegrowindoors.com
Harvestmore of www.harvest-more.com
Deer defeat www.deerdefeat.com
Blue ribbon organics www.blueribbonorganics.com
Bluemel's garden & landscape center www.bluemels.com Milwaukee,WI official garden center of the show
Wisconsin Greenhouse company of https://wisconsingreenhousecompany.com/
Chip Drop of https://getchipdrop.com/?ref=wisconsinvegetable
Tree-Ripe Fruit Co of https://www.tree-ripe.com/
Big elk Garlic farm https://www.bigelkgarlicfarm.com/#/
Pearls premium Ultra Low Maintenance https://www.pearlspremium.com/
Use coupon code Joey20 to save 20% off your order

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